Business

Business news

Mary Rose Madden

Local foundations and the federal government have promised to funnel money into Baltimore for job training programs to respond to some of the communities’ needs articulated during the weeks or protests after the death of Freddie Gray. But what happens when the jobs don’t materialize?

Take Janet Littlejohn, for example. She had a full basketball scholarship to Coppin State University right after high school.  She was working on her nursing degree until she broke her leg. She lost her scholarship and couldn’t afford tuition, so she had to drop out.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

From Greater Rosemont to Druid Heights, community leaders are seeing last week's riots in the city as an opportunity to attract the investment that by-passed Baltimore for other cities after riots in 1968 after the death of Rev. Martin Luther King.

"Hopefully if our leaders – not only government but the private sector, the foundations and everything – will get together and really focus and opportunities will be created," said Kelly Little,  former executive director of the Druid Heights Community Development Corporation.

Costas Inn on North Point Boulevard in Dundalk smells like beer and crab cakes. There was a pretty good crowd on a recent Friday.  But Donna Grover, a long-time regular, says it’s nothing like it was when Bethlehem Steel was running full strength at Sparrows Point, a few miles away. "This bar used to be packed like sardines and since Sparrows Point shut down, it staggers," Grover said.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

  Ed Yoon, chief technology officer of dataFascia, is drawing a diagram on a wall in his office.  Don’t worry; the paint used in the offices turns a boring wall into a dry erase board.

His company is working on a way to make electronic health records, EHRs, more available to app developers.

“In essence, we’re sort of a middleware lair that allows us to take data from different EHR's and abstract that in a way so that the app developer is just looking at the data; not caring really caring where the data's actually coming from,” says Yoon.

On the sixth floor, Lauren Dickinson and Matthew Davenport with Gemstone Biotherapeutics, a regenerative medicine company, sets up new equipment in a shared lab space.

The two companies, dataFascia and Gemstone, are among several companies that have moved into Johns Hopkins University’s second business accelerator, Fast Forward East, at the corner of North Wolfe Street and Ashland Avenues.

The school is to hold an open house Wednesday.

John Lee for wypr

    

The new owners of Sparrows Point have ambitious plans to redevelop the 3,100 acres on the lower east side of Baltimore County. But at the same time, they are beginning a massive cleanup for the industrial site where steel was made for more than a century.

Sparrows Point: Planning A Rebirth

Feb 9, 2015
John Lee for wypr

Sparrows Point was once home to the largest steel mill in the world.  Today, it's home to abandoned and torn down buildings, environmental contamination and vegetation run amuck. But there is a new plan to bring back the former home of Bethlehem Steel known simply as The Point.

NYC Eatery Hygiene Grade Pending by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com via flickr

Baltimore restaurant owners may soon have to brush up on the A, B and Cs of health department inspections, if City Councilman Brandon Scott’s bill makes it to the mayor’s desk.

John Lee / WYPR

Maryland farmers are worried about regulations in the works at the state Department of Agriculture.

Thanet Wind Farm in the English Channel, London to Italy Flight, 24/07/2012 taken by DG Jones via flickr

Energy company US Wind Inc, a subsidiary of the Italian company Renexia, won Tuesday's auction to develop wind farms on federal waters ten nautical miles off the coast of Ocean City.

Hans Hillewaert via Wikimedia Commons

The federal government holds an auction Tuesday for two leases to develop wind farms in federal waters off Ocean City.

Pages