Tom Chaulkey

    

Here’s the other good reason for banning racial and other profiling. Atty. Gen. Brian Frosh reminds us that profiling is counterproductive.

flickr/keithallison

  There are three options to pay for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s $136 million plan to overhaul aging city rec centers. But no matter which one city leaders choose, at least one economist says they should choose wisely.

Baltimore County’s violent crime rate dropped by a little more than six percent last year, even though the population increased.

County police released crime stats Wednesday showing there were 25 murders in 2014, matching the annual average over the previous five years. But the number of rapes went down by nearly 30 percent and aggravated assaults dropped by more than 11 percent.

Steve Johnson via flickr / minimalistphotography101.com

It’s late August already, and while attention among sports fans in much of the country has turned toward the impending NFL season, there are almost as many who eagerly await the start of college football. One of those places is in Waco, Texas, where the Baylor faithful hope this will be the season their Bears lead them to the promised land of a national championship.

Fraser Smith and Mileah Kromer, of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center at Goucher College, discuss the latest polling from Iowa and what that means for Governor Martin O'Malley's presidential chances.

  When police officers are accused of misconduct – whether it’s excessive use of force or other lesser abuses – the internal police investigations are governed by the Law Enforcement Officers Bill of Rights. The rules were written into law in 1974 to protect the due process rights of accused officers, but they’ve become a flashpoint for activists who argue they impede transparency and accountability from their police departments. Yesterday, a panel of state lawmakers took up the question of reforming the so-called LEOBR.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

A federal judge has approved a settlement between a Houston man who owns derelict properties in Baltimore and six city community associations in the first case using a state law that allows associations to sue the owners of blighted properties.

Scott Wizig and several limited liability companies that hold titles to more than 50 dilapidated homes throughout the city will be required to rehab the properties that can be saved and demolish the ones that can’t.  

The settlement was approved in federal bankruptcy court Tuesday.

    Fraser Smith and Todd Eberly, of St. Mary's College political science department, discuss former Governor Martin O'Malley's chances in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

 

Tom Chaulkey

As a child, Dr. Keiffer Mitchell watched as his famous father – Clarence Mitchell, Jr. – confronted opponents of school desegregation.

A fourth grader, when the famous Brown vs. Board of Education decision came down, he never forgot the image of his father’s witness for equality in America – and for his son.

As a recent graduate of Lincoln University, his father – Clarence Mitchell Jr. -- got a job reporting for the Afro American newspaper. One of his first assignments was the lynching of George Armwood in 1933.

Fraser Smith and Luke Broadwater, of the Baltimore Sun, discuss potential challengers to incumbent Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and former Mayor Sheila Dixon in next year's election.

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