Gwendolyn Glenn / WYPR

Earlier this year, 20 Maryland teachers were paired with professional musicians, singers and other artists to develop week-long lessons connecting the arts with the Common Core standards.

The artists went through Common Core training, the teachers learned how to blend the arts into their instruction and the lessons the teams created together went live in some Maryland classrooms this week.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

  

There is a house on Stonewood Road in the New Northwood neighborhood in Northeast Baltimore that is clearly falling apart.

The rain gutters are hanging on their last hinges.  The shingles are peeling away from the roof. Rusted outdoor furniture is on the front porch and the railings are wrapped in weather beaten garland for the holidays. More Christmas decorations stick up from a couple of flower pots.

It looks as if neighbors have been trying to take care of the yard.  Someone had started bagging leaves.

When you apply for health insurance on the exchange, you’ve got to put in some basic information. Age, location, gender and income are some of the data points that the health exchange collects from applicants-- race and ethnicity are optional on the application. Taken together, these data points help paint a picture of who and where the exchange has successfully reached.

Tom Chaulkey

When you get on the civil rights train, you can never get off. That was the late Parren Mitchell’s urging. Contemporary events, if nothing else, prove him quite right. He and his famous civil rights family knew the landscape as well as any. You couldn’t get off the civil rights train because it had not – might not ever – reach its destination. The struggle would not end. You had to ride on and on. 

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

When Larry Hogan is sworn in next month, he’ll bring with him a whole new cabinet. The governor-elect started naming his cabinet picks Wednesday afternoon.

Hogan and his lieutenant governor – as well as his chief of staff, legislative director and his fiscal advisor – all served in former Republican Governor Bob Ehrlich’s administration. Another Ehrlich veteran, Jim Fielder, will join Hogan as appointments secretary. That’s the post that Hogan held a decade ago.

Christopher Connelly / WYPR

YPR's Senior News Analyst, Fraser Smith, talks to The Daily Record's Bryan Sears about how Governor-elect Larry Hogan will tackle Maryland's structural deficit.  

Christopher Connelly / WYPR

  Maryland should expect to have about $271 million dollars less than expected coming into its coffers over the next year and a half – that was the news out of the state’s Board of Revenue Estimates Monday. It follows already downgraded expectations for the state’s revenues.

Comptroller Peter Franchot, the state’s tax man, blamed cuts in federal spending for a state economy growing slower than expected. The state is home to about 300,000 federal workers, as well as numerous government contractors.

Keith Allison via flickr

Remember a few weeks ago, just after the Orioles lost to the Kansas City Royals in the American League Championship Series, when we wondered if the season the Birds had would be enough to forget the sting of coming up short in the quest for a World Series title?

taken at CPAC 2013 by Gage Skidmore via flickr

Last month, voters in the District of Columbia approved a referendum that allowed residents to possess up to two ounces of marijuana and grow as many as three cannabis plants. But Maryland Rep. Andy Harris (R-Baltimore Co.) has continued his opposition to pot legalization in the nation's capital. WYPR's Fraser Smith talks to Washington Post reporter Aaron Davis about efforts by Harris to block legalization in D.C. and why the issue is likely to end up in court.

Gov.-elect Larry Hogan briefed reporters on the state’s fiscal situation yesterday afternoon and the picture he painted was dire. Maryland’s next governor says the state needs ‘strong medicine’ to fix its fiscal health after years of bad budgeting.

“Let me put it in everyday terms: They drained our checking, savings and retirement accounts. They maxed out every credit card. They tapped into Christmas funds, college tuition funds,  they even broke into every one of the kids piggy banks, and we still don’t have enough to pay the bills," Hogan said.

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