absenteeism

A Bright Spot In The Battle Against Chronic Absenteeism

Mar 27, 2014
Gwendolyn Glenn / WYPR

At some schools in Baltimore city, 65 percent of students miss 20 or more days of school annually.

One School’s Battle with Chronic Absenteeism

Mar 25, 2014
Gwendolyn Glenn / WYPR

This month, Baltimore city school's interim Superintendent Tisha Edwards warned 61 principals that they could face disciplinary action if they don’t reduce high chronic absenteeism rates in their schools.

Maryland State Department of Education

A web-exclusive installment in our year-long series Empty Desks: The Effects of Chronic Absenteeism.

Chronic absenteeism—missing 20 days or more of school in a year—dropped in Baltimore city last year, but only by about 2 percent. This graph compares school years 2009-2010, 2010-2011 and 2011-2012, the most recent year for which statistics are available. The numbers were compiled by the Maryland State Department of Education.

Getting To School Is Harder Than You Think

May 17, 2013
Tyra Brown

More than 17,000 Baltimore students miss 20 or more days of school a year. Many of these chronically absent students and their parents say transportation is a major reason for their absences. That’s because nearly 30,000 city students use public transportation to get to school—students like 13-year-old Juwan Nobel and his 9-year-old brother Javon  Nobel.

Why Some Homeless Students Travel 2 Hours to School

Mar 14, 2013
Gwendolyn Glenn / WYPR

Baltimore city school officials say the number of homeless students enrolled in the district so far, 1,900, is higher than it was last year at this time. What’s just as worrisome for officials is that 44 percent of those students are chronically absent from school.

Empty Desks: The Effects of Chronic Absenteeism

Mar 8, 2013
H is for Home / Flickr via Compfight

The first installment in a year-long series.

In Maryland, more than 85 thousand students miss a month or more of school annually, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. About 17,000 of those students live in Baltimore city.

At Sarah’s Hope homeless shelter in Baltimore, shelter officials said 10-year-old Jacora Franklin misses school a lot. Sometimes it’s because her bus doesn’t show up, sometimes she’s sick and other times she just doesn’t feel like going—partly because she gets teased for being homeless.