Baltimore Metro

P. Kenneth Burns

The police sergeant who trained Officer Edward Nero in the field praised him Tuesday as the defense continued its case in Nero’s trial on charges stemming from the death last year of Freddie Gray in police custody.

Baltimore Police

 Officer Garret Miller testified yesterday that it was he who handcuffed Freddie Gray at the time of his arrest in April 2015, not Officer Edward Nero, and that he later placed leg restraints on Gray at the second stop of the police van taking Gray to the Western District station.

He also said he made the call for the wagon to meet them at the edge of Gilmore Homes to pick up Gray.

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors could call one, or even two, of police Officer Edward Nero’s colleagues to testify against him today as his trial on charges in the Freddie Gray case goes into a third day.

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors played the statement police Officer Edward Nero gave to investigators during the second day of Nero’s trial.  The state spent much of the day focused on what took place on April 12, 2015; the day of the arrest.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

During opening statements, Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow told Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams that Officer Edward Nero disregarded his police training when he chased Freddie Gray and arrested him without probable cause, and was callously indifferent to the 25-year-old's wellbeing when he failed to secure him in a seatbelt.

Schatzow spent about 20 minutes laying out the state's argument.

Rachel Baye

The fight over air conditioning in Baltimore County schools boiled over at Wednesday’s state Board of Public Works meeting.

The board voted to withhold school construction money from both the county and Baltimore City until the two jurisdictions release a plan for putting air-conditioning in every classroom by the start of the next school year.

Nero: Baltimore Police/Williams: Maryland Judiciary

  Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams granted Tuesday morning a request from police Officer Edward Nero for a bench trial.

Nero has been charged with second degree assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment in the case of Freddie Gray, who died from a broken neck suffered while in the back of a police van last year.

Baltimore Police

After months of delays and action by Maryland’s highest court, trials against six police officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray were to resume Tuesday morning at Courthouse East with pre-trial motions.  But the actual trial will be put off for one more day.

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby asked for a one day delay in the start of Officer Edward Nero’s trial because a power outage in her office over the weekend slowed preparations.  Nero’s lawyers said they had no objection. 

Once the trial begins, prosecutors are expected to argue that Nero, one of the arresting officers, did not have the authority to chase Gray on April 12, 2015.  That made Gray’s arrest illegal and putting him in handcuffs amounted to assault.

John Lee

   

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz has shaved two years off his plans for central air conditioning in the county’s schools. But that doesn’t mean the feud between him and state Comptroller Peter Franchot is cooling off. In fact, Franchot, who wants Kamenetz to speed up the process by putting in window units, is promising to let it boil over at next week’s state Board of Public Works meeting. 

TIFs: The primer

May 5, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

Baltimore is about to deal with another controversial tax financing package for re-developing part of the city.  This time it’s a $535 million deal for Kevin Plank’s Sagamore Development, which is proposing a huge mixed-use project at Port Covington in South Baltimore.

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