WYPR News

Rachel Baye

Gov. Larry Hogan has so far signed more than 475 bills the General Assembly passed this year. But with just one more bill signing scheduled this week, some Democratic legislators are worried that a bill that aims to offset the cost of college tuition won’t make the cut.

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors could call one, or even two, of police Officer Edward Nero’s colleagues to testify against him today as his trial on charges in the Freddie Gray case goes into a third day.

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors played the statement police Officer Edward Nero gave to investigators during the second day of Nero’s trial.  The state spent much of the day focused on what took place on April 12, 2015; the day of the arrest.

    

Fraser Smith and Bryan Sears, of The Daily Record, take on the politics of air conditioning schools.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

During opening statements, Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow told Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams that Officer Edward Nero disregarded his police training when he chased Freddie Gray and arrested him without probable cause, and was callously indifferent to the 25-year-old's wellbeing when he failed to secure him in a seatbelt.

Schatzow spent about 20 minutes laying out the state's argument.

John Lee

The day after former Mayor Sheila Dixon announced she wouldn’t seek a recount in Baltimore’s Democratic mayoral primary, the state Board of Elections de-certified those results and began a review. 

Fraser Smith and Andy Green of the Baltimore Sun's editorial board, discuss the City Council's effort to change the city charter to gain more fiscal control and how that could play out in an election year.   

Nero: Baltimore Police/Williams: Maryland Judiciary

  Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams granted Tuesday morning a request from police Officer Edward Nero for a bench trial.

Nero has been charged with second degree assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment in the case of Freddie Gray, who died from a broken neck suffered while in the back of a police van last year.

 

 

 

This spring every third grader in the city received a colorful, graphic textbook thanks to the work of graphic designer and educator Becky Slogeris.     

On a rainy day, Ms. Heather Tuttle’s third grade social studies classroom at Lake Montebello Elementary in Northeast Baltimore, reads from a book written just for Baltimore City kids.

 

"Jane Jacobs was a writer and thinker about cities," Tawnaja Hilton reads. "Jane did not learn about cities from books or schools. Instead she learned about cities by watching people use them in every li- in everyday life."

 

The students in groups. They all have their own copies of My Baltimore Book . It’s about the size of a short novel -- A mix between a textbook, journal and photobook.

 

Baltimore Police

After months of delays and action by Maryland’s highest court, trials against six police officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray were to resume Tuesday morning at Courthouse East with pre-trial motions.  But the actual trial will be put off for one more day.

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby asked for a one day delay in the start of Officer Edward Nero’s trial because a power outage in her office over the weekend slowed preparations.  Nero’s lawyers said they had no objection. 

Once the trial begins, prosecutors are expected to argue that Nero, one of the arresting officers, did not have the authority to chase Gray on April 12, 2015.  That made Gray’s arrest illegal and putting him in handcuffs amounted to assault.

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