Sports news

Mike Tigas

In the days since now former University of Missouri president Tim Wolfe was toppled from office by a band of students, people have searched to find the takeaway lesson.

Keith Allison via flickr

When Orioles fans recall the great moments of the 2015 season, at least they'll have the weekend.  The Birds swept a three-game series, keeping the hated Yankees from clinching home field for Tuesday's wild card game.  But even those fleeting moments of glory couldn't lessen the pain of knowing that, unlike last season or the 2012 season, the Orioles would not be playing past Sunday.  And unlike the last three campaigns, 2015 will end with the Orioles failing to garner a winning record.

Jimmy Balkovicius

We’re just past Labor Day and with its passing comes the unofficial end of the summer.

And the end of this summer marks the end of arguably the most visible year for women in sports in decades, if not ever.

Notice that I didn’t say the best year. Women have been having great sporting years for, well, years, setting records, winning Olympic gold medals and conquering heretofore unclimbed mountains.

Parker Anderson via flickr

The labor union has taken a tremendous beating over the last 30 or so years, and nowhere is that more obvious than in the sporting realm.

By comparison to the baseball union, which has historically been strong, the NFL Players Association has seemed ineffective and weak.

Malingering via flickr

For any number of reasons, baseball remains the one sport where comparisons between players of different generations can’t be dismissed out of hand.

The one thing about baseball that has not changed for the better over the years is in the quality of announcers. The men who call the game today simply aren’t as good as their predecessors.

Steve Johnson via flickr /

It’s late August already, and while attention among sports fans in much of the country has turned toward the impending NFL season, there are almost as many who eagerly await the start of college football. One of those places is in Waco, Texas, where the Baylor faithful hope this will be the season their Bears lead them to the promised land of a national championship.

AJ Guel

For most Americans, Sunday is the day of the week where two of our most significant institutions, religion and professional football are most visibly on display. The two entities intersect in a big way on most Sundays. Many people of faith slide comfortably from their spiritual houses of worship to their secular ones, the stadiums where their football gods have taken up residence. Inside those football tabernacles, religion is freely and fervently practiced, with the usually tacit, but sometimes vocal approval of the spectators.

Deejay via flickr

As teams begin to report to training camp this week, I continue to find myself in a bit of a quandary over how a sport whose leadership shows such a continued indifference over how the public perceives it much less how it treats its players can still thrive.

Matt Chan via flickr

University of Maryland president Wallace Loh has proposed to break with tradition once again, by allowing the sale of beer and wine to the general public at the football and basketball arenas on campus beginning in the fall.

With the possible exception of the moment when the people at Coke went back to the original formula, few things have been as universally celebrated in this country than American Pharoah’s win in the Belmont Saturday.