Johns Hopkins

    

WYPR's senior news analyst says the city's biggest employer offers the city's neediest neighborhoods a hand up.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

  Ed Yoon, chief technology officer of dataFascia, is drawing a diagram on a wall in his office.  Don’t worry; the paint used in the offices turns a boring wall into a dry erase board.

His company is working on a way to make electronic health records, EHRs, more available to app developers.

“In essence, we’re sort of a middleware lair that allows us to take data from different EHR's and abstract that in a way so that the app developer is just looking at the data; not caring really caring where the data's actually coming from,” says Yoon.

On the sixth floor, Lauren Dickinson and Matthew Davenport with Gemstone Biotherapeutics, a regenerative medicine company, sets up new equipment in a shared lab space.

The two companies, dataFascia and Gemstone, are among several companies that have moved into Johns Hopkins University’s second business accelerator, Fast Forward East, at the corner of North Wolfe Street and Ashland Avenues.

The school is to hold an open house Wednesday.

John Hopkins in cloudy weather taken by callison-burch via flickr

On December 3, Baltimore City Police announced in a press release the arrest of two Reiserstown men in conjunction with the alleged gang rape of a 16-year-old girl on November 2 at the Johns Hopkins Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house on 29th and St Paul Streets. Both the victim and the alleged perpetrators were not affiliated with the University.

This case is the second high-profile sexual assault headline involving Johns Hopkins this year. The University became one of 76 schools under investigation by the U.S. Department of Education last spring for failing to comply with the Clery Act, which requires schools to report sexual assaults. That stemmed from the mishandling of a Towson University student’s report that she was gang-raped at the Pi Kappa Alpha - or PIKE - house in March of 2013. 

Gwendolyn Glenn / WYPR

While many students are enjoying a break from the books this summer, four Baltimore city youths are spending their time working on complex experiments in labs at Johns Hopkins University. The students are participants in the Biophysics Research for Baltimore Teens (BRBT) program. In its second year, the program, funded mainly by the university and the Mayor’s office, is designed to give disadvantaged youths more exposure to the sciences.