Freddie Gray

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors in the upcoming trial of police Officer Edward Nero are trying to keep the jury from hearing certain evidence.

Nero is one of six officers charged in the death last April of Freddie Gray.

The prosecutors have asked Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams to keep information about Gray’s criminal record, past hospitalizations, prior civil claims and lead paint exposure as a child from coming out at the trial.

Baltimore Police

Two Baltimore police officers charged in the Freddie Gray case are opposing the state's motion to delay their trials until appellate courts decide whether another officer can be compelled to testify against them.

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors in Baltimore are asking an appeals court to compel a police officer to testify against three fellow officers in the Freddie Gray case.

Baltimore Police

A judge has rejected prosecutors' request to force a Baltimore police officer to testify against three of his colleagues facing charges in connection with Freddie Gray's death.

Lawmakers recommend police accountability reforms

Jan 12, 2016
Rachel Baye

Maryland lawmakers recommended on Monday nearly two dozen changes to state law aimed at holding police accountable to the public.

Officials say they hope the actions would improve law enforcement’s relationship with the communities they serve—if the recommendations become legislation and pass during the legislative session that begins this week.

The bipartisan group recommended several changes to police officers’ internal disciplinary process.

Porter and Goodson: Baltimore Police; Courthouse East: P. Kenneth Burns/WYPR

The Court of Special Appeals – Maryland’s second highest court – halted Monday morning the trial of police Officer Caesar Goodson; the second of six officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray.  Circuit Judge Barry Williams announced the order in court before jury selection was to begin in Goodson’s trial. 

Goodson Mug Shot: Baltimore Police/Graphic: P. Kenneth Burns

The trial of police Officer Caesar Goodson begins Monday with a cloud of uncertainty around the prosecution’s star witness – fellow police Officer William Porter.

The Court of Special Appeals, Maryland’s second highest court, blocked Friday an order from Judge Barry Williams forcing Porter to testify in the upcoming trial to allow time for an appeal of the order to play out.

Baltimore Police

A Maryland appeals court has issued a temporary order that says a police officer doesn't have to testify against a colleague who is going on trial in the death of Freddie Gray.

The court says it issued a temporary decision because it wants to give prosecutors time to respond to whether Officer William Porter should be forced to testify at Officer Caesar Goodson's second-degree murder trial. Prosecutors want Porter to testify.

Porter and Goodson: Baltimore Police; Courthouse East: P. Kenneth Burns/WYPR

Lawyers for Officer William Porter requested an injunction Thursday morning to keep him from testifying in the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six defendants in the Freddie Gray case.

The motion filed at the Court of Special Appeals by defense attorney Gary Proctor is an effort to quash a ruling Wednesday by Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams forcing Porter to testify. Legal observers say Williams’ decision is unprecedented and hands prosecutors a big victory.

Baltimore Police

Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams ruled Wednesday that police Officer William Porter will have to appear and testify during the upcoming trial of Officer Caesar Goodson. But Porter’s lawyers say they won’t let that happen without a fight.

Defense attorney Gary Proctor said he would seek to block the ruling.

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