Freddie Gray

Baltimore Police

 Officer Garret Miller testified yesterday that it was he who handcuffed Freddie Gray at the time of his arrest in April 2015, not Officer Edward Nero, and that he later placed leg restraints on Gray at the second stop of the police van taking Gray to the Western District station.

He also said he made the call for the wagon to meet them at the edge of Gilmore Homes to pick up Gray.

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors could call one, or even two, of police Officer Edward Nero’s colleagues to testify against him today as his trial on charges in the Freddie Gray case goes into a third day.

Baltimore Police

Prosecutors played the statement police Officer Edward Nero gave to investigators during the second day of Nero’s trial.  The state spent much of the day focused on what took place on April 12, 2015; the day of the arrest.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

During opening statements, Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow told Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams that Officer Edward Nero disregarded his police training when he chased Freddie Gray and arrested him without probable cause, and was callously indifferent to the 25-year-old's wellbeing when he failed to secure him in a seatbelt.

Schatzow spent about 20 minutes laying out the state's argument.

Nero: Baltimore Police/Williams: Maryland Judiciary

  Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams granted Tuesday morning a request from police Officer Edward Nero for a bench trial.

Nero has been charged with second degree assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment in the case of Freddie Gray, who died from a broken neck suffered while in the back of a police van last year.

Baltimore Police

After months of delays and action by Maryland’s highest court, trials against six police officers accused in the death of Freddie Gray were to resume Tuesday morning at Courthouse East with pre-trial motions.  But the actual trial will be put off for one more day.

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby asked for a one day delay in the start of Officer Edward Nero’s trial because a power outage in her office over the weekend slowed preparations.  Nero’s lawyers said they had no objection. 

Once the trial begins, prosecutors are expected to argue that Nero, one of the arresting officers, did not have the authority to chase Gray on April 12, 2015.  That made Gray’s arrest illegal and putting him in handcuffs amounted to assault.

P. Kenneth Burns

    

The Rev. Jamal Bryant, who delivered the eulogy at Freddie Gray’s funeral, says he wanted to deliver a message that spoke both to the 25-year-old’s mourning family and to an angry community.

Jonna McKone

There's been a lot of attention focused on Baltimore's youth in the year since Freddie Gray died. And much of that spotlight has been on Frederick Douglass High School. Images of dozens of Douglass students throwing rocks and bottles were captured on TV as protests turned violent the day of Gray's funeral.

Baltimore Police

  On May 1, 2015 – two weeks after Freddie Gray’s death - Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby stood before the world at the War Memorial to announce charges against six officers she says were responsible for Freddie Gray’s death.

University of Maryland Law Professor Doug Colbert says that was a rare occurrence.

“You must recognize the unusual nature of bringing criminal charges against any of the officers who are from the department that they depend upon for prosecution and ultimately conviction,” he says.

Mary Rose Madden

Even before the riots broke out in Baltimore, tensions were high near the western district police station.  The western district is where Freddie Gray lived, where he was arrested.

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