education

21st Century Schools Building Program

Baltimore’s school system has embarked on an ambitious project to renovate, replace and combine dozens of the oldest schools in the state over the next four years.   

The $1 billion effort aims to shutter and combine dozens of schools and renovate or replace at least 23 – all by the spring of 2021.  

A 2012 report by the Jacobs Project Management Company, a consulting firm, found that 85 percent, or 138 of the schools are in “poor” or “very poor” condition.

 

 

 

This spring every third grader in the city received a colorful, graphic textbook thanks to the work of graphic designer and educator Becky Slogeris.     

On a rainy day, Ms. Heather Tuttle’s third grade social studies classroom at Lake Montebello Elementary in Northeast Baltimore, reads from a book written just for Baltimore City kids.

 

"Jane Jacobs was a writer and thinker about cities," Tawnaja Hilton reads. "Jane did not learn about cities from books or schools. Instead she learned about cities by watching people use them in every li- in everyday life."

 

The students in groups. They all have their own copies of My Baltimore Book . It’s about the size of a short novel -- A mix between a textbook, journal and photobook.

 

Jonna McKone

There's been a lot of attention focused on Baltimore's youth in the year since Freddie Gray died. And much of that spotlight has been on Frederick Douglass High School. Images of dozens of Douglass students throwing rocks and bottles were captured on TV as protests turned violent the day of Gray's funeral.

Wikimedia Commons

Public schools and some private schools will teach students as early as kindergarten about sexual abuse and assault if Gov. Larry Hogan signs a bill headed to his desk. Schools across the state could see the new material as early as next school year.

Jonna McKone

If there’s one thing all the Democrats running to be Baltimore’s next mayor agree on, it’s universal pre-k.

Legislative leaders target Baltimore

Mar 17, 2016
Rachel Baye

With a month left in the General Assembly’s annual 90-day session, the leaders of both houses have announced a focus on Baltimore.

House Speaker Michael Busch and Senate President Mike Miller are backing a package of bills that includes efforts to renew development and boost education in the city. 

Baltimore City

As we heard Wednesday in the first part of this series, thousands of Baltimore City eighth and fifth graders found out last week whether they got into the high school they hoped to attend, or whether they’re going somewhere else next year.  Jonna McKone looks at school choice is working for families in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Renaissance Academy, a high school of just over 300 students, occupies an old brick building in West Baltimore’s Upton neighborhood. It’s a community school, where students and their families can tap into everything from a food pantry to college course offerings to free hygiene products.

Thousands of Baltimore City eighth graders found out last week whether they got into the high school they hoped to attend, or whether they’re going somewhere else next year. Same thing for fifth graders applying to middle schools. The policy is called school choice. In the first of a two-part series, we look at what is and isn’t working with school choice.

The theory behind school choice is that where you live shouldn’t dictate where you go to school. Just because you’re growing up in a poor area, you shouldn’t be limited to a badly performing neighborhood school.

Baltimore’s schools started their choice program in 2002 and during that same period began closing troubled schools and creating smaller high schools with specialized focuses.  The idea is to allow students and families to select the school that best fits them.

 

Nearly 400,000 Maryland students qualify for free or reduced price lunches, about 45 percent of all students. Now schools across the state are trying to expand programs that connect those students with free breakfasts as well.

Creative Commons

For students like Clarksburg High School senior Angie Nseliema, standardized tests mean a disruption of the normal school routine.

On the first day of state-mandated exams, she missed all her classes for the first half of the day and had substitute teachers the rest of the day.

Pages