P. Kenneth Burns

Reporter

Kenneth Burns is WYPR's Metro Reporter; covering issues that affect Baltimore City, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties.

Prior to joining WYPR, Kenneth worked at WBAL Radio and WNAV in Annapolis.

The Prince George's County native has been a journalist since high school. He was a teen editor with Children's Express, later becoming news editor with Young D.C., a newspaper written by high school students. He started his professional career during his first year in college at WTOP in Washington, D.C. Other career stops includes the Radio America Network and Salem Communications as a producer. He also was a news contributor to WGMD in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware.

Kenneth, who lives in Baltimore, earned his associate's degree from Anne Arundel Community College and his bachelor's degree in political science from Towson University. He is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists and the Online News Association.

You can keep up with his "notebook" at kennethburns.tumblr.com and follow him on twitter @PKBNews.

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The Baltimore County liquor board has dismissed a challenge to the renewal of The Recher Theatre’s liquor license by a group led by Towson attorney Charles Brooks. The board cited a rule that requires “all protestants” to appear “in person at the hearing.”  Only nine of the 10 who signed a protest petition appeared at Monday’s hearing. The 10th sent a letter that was read aloud during the hearing.  Brooks said that person is disabled and was not able to appear.  He said he’ll appeal the ruling to the county Circuit Court.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

The second phase of the redevelopment of a North Baltimore neighborhood is well underway.  Many former residents in Barclay are reluctant to move back, which does not surprise officials. People who frequent the area of East 20th Street between Barclay and Greenmount are familiar with the sight of construction workers and heavy machinery. They’ve been around since December, working on the second phase of the Barclay Redevelopment project. It is to have 69-rental units, 30 homes for sale and a park. Officials from the city and Telesis Corporation, which is leading the project, plan to notify former residents over the next couple of months that some units will be ready in the fall. Yet they know that many chose not to return after phase one was completed in 2011.

 

If you look at East Monument Street between Bradford and Montford, you can’t tell that there was a sinkhole here last year. 

Going down 40 feet deep, that is not for the faint of heart at all.

   But Kim Burgess, of the city’s public works department, remembers the details well, right down to the call on June 25th. Burgess, who runs the department’s surface water management division, says officials suspected that a 10-foot storm drain pipe buried 40 feet below the surface was the culprit.  There was just one problem. 

Baltimore Department of Public Works

A storm water fee for Baltimore City homeowners could cost up to $144 a year, bringing in $12 million next year to upgrade the city’s crumbling storm drain system.  

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

What started as a movie theater on York Road eventually became a well-known concert venue. The Recher Theatre’s wall of fame holds pictures of a who’s who of national and local music artists who performed here, including Dave Mason, George Clinton and the Kelly Bell Band. 

 Towson’s Recher Theatre will host its final concert on Sunday. But local business owners and some residents are making some noise about plans for its future. WYPR’s Kenneth Burns reports.

What started as a movie theater on York Road eventually became a well-known concert venue. The theatre’s wall of fame holds pictures of a who’s who of national and local music artists who performed here, including Dave Mason, George Clinton and the Kelly Bell Band. Brian Recher co-owns the theatre with his brother, Scott.

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