Mary Rose Madden

Senior News Producer and Reporter

Mary Rose is a reporter and senior news producer for 88.1 WYPR FM, a National Public Radio member station in Baltimore.  At the local news desk, she assigns stories, organizes special coverage, edits news stories, develops series and reports. She has coordinated election coverage—including the 2008 presidential election—and written for award-winning series such as "Growing up Baltimore" and "Baltimore '68: The Fire Last Time."  She has covered stories from the foreclosure crisis to the horse-racing industry, from the alarming high school dropout problem in Baltimore to a traditional college marching band gone hip-hop.  She reported on the rights American Indians have – or rather don’t have – to their ancestors’ remains in Maryland.  And with this reporting, state legislators signed a law that would change that.

She's reported from Rwanda for The International Reporting Project and won a national award for her story on the children who were born of rape during the 1994 genocide.  Before entering journalism, she worked in the social development of children and families and worked in a hospice providing support to families.

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When a movie ends, do you find yourself wanting to sort through the characters’ inner lives?  Do you want to pull it apart and discuss? Want to watch the movie with a professional therapist at your side? If so, there’s a film series for you.

Mary Rose Madden / WYPR

Baltimore said “Welcome Home” to The Orioles today – Camden Yards was sold out for the Opening Day of the 2013 season.   But, before all the fans started filing in, before the fresh chalk was drawn on the field, and before batting practice, Orioles Manager Buck Showalter sat down to wax philosophical about what opening day means to him, how he looks at his favorite sport, and the challenges facing Brian Roberts.   Dressed in his orange and black and walking with a cane after knee surgery in the off season, Buck Showalter sat down to talk to reporters and immediately started cracking jokes. 

Dressed in his orange and black and walking with a cane after knee surgery in the off season, Buck Showalter sat down to talk to reporters and immediately started cracking jokes. 

Mary Rose Madden / WYPR

Camden Yards was buzzing this week.  Fans were lined up at the ticket booths,  strategizing; which seats, which games, what price.   The Baltimore Orioles open the first home stand of their 2013 season later today. WYPR’s Mary Rose Madden stopped by the ball park recently to check on the preparations.

 Read the full transcript here.

Mary Rose Madden / WYPR

The Baltimore Orioles open the first home stand of their 2013 season later today at Camden yards. WYPR’s Mary Rose Madden stopped by the ball park recently to check on the preparations.

 Camden Yards was buzzing this week. Fans were lined up at the ticket booths, strategizing; which seats, which games, what price.

Xavior Boone, 63, was helping a co-worker decide. He already has a 29-game season ticket plan.

“My mother worked at memorial stadium when I was a kid. I had the baseball scrapbook and the baseball cards.”

Mr. T in DC via Compfight

Hidden beneath the crush of gas tax, gun bills and death penalty repeal that the Maryland General Assembly is wrestling with this year are smaller ones that don’t get much notice. And as time grows short, many of them die. The measure, which would have forbidden landlords to discriminate against tenants based on their source of income, had occupied hours of the Senate’s time when Senator James Rosapepe, a College Park Democrat, moved to send it back to the committee where it originated, essentially killing the bill.

Hidden beneath the crush of gas tax, gun bills and death penalty repeal that the Maryland General Assembly is wrestling with this year are smaller ones that don’t get much notice. And as time grows short, many of them die. WYPR’s Mary Rose Madden explores what happened to one of those bills, The Home Act.

  Less than ten days after city officials evicted people from a homeless encampment in downtown Baltimore, a homicide occurred at one of the city’s shelters.

The advocates, college students and homeless people who attended the weekly meeting of Bmore Housing For All wanted to talk about Sunday's stabbing at The Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Housing Resource Center, a homeless shelter on the Fallsway.

Lee Parker, 59, said he was there – heard the whole thing. He remembers seeing the victim stumbling up the stairs, blood coming from his mouth.

Mary Rose Madden / WYPR

Several Maryland counties are conducting a homeless persons count this time of year. The census is required by the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and helps them decide what funding should be allocated toward homelessness. The last time the census was taken in Baltimore, 4,000 people were counted as homeless.

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