Mary Rose Madden

Senior News Producer and Reporter

Mary Rose is a reporter and senior news producer for 88.1 WYPR FM, a National Public Radio member station in Baltimore.  At the local news desk, she assigns stories, organizes special coverage, edits news stories, develops series and reports. She has coordinated election coverage—including the 2008 presidential election—and written for award-winning series such as "Growing up Baltimore" and "Baltimore '68: The Fire Last Time."  She has covered stories from the foreclosure crisis to the horse-racing industry, from the alarming high school dropout problem in Baltimore to a traditional college marching band gone hip-hop.  She reported on the rights American Indians have – or rather don’t have – to their ancestors’ remains in Maryland.  And with this reporting, state legislators signed a law that would change that.

She's reported from Rwanda for The International Reporting Project and won a national award for her story on the children who were born of rape during the 1994 genocide.  Before entering journalism, she worked in the social development of children and families and worked in a hospice providing support to families.

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Mary Rose Madden / wypr

Three weeks before he was fired, Former Police Commissioner Anthony Batts held a meeting in a basketball court adjacent to a playground in West Baltimore. The community was invited to observe the meeting police were calling “community comstat”.

Mary Rose Madden for wypr

Programming Note: Today, we start a police reform series called, "On The Watch: Fixing The Fractured Relationship Between Baltimore's Police And Its Communities".  The series will run for the next twelve months.  Please email the reporter at mmadden@wypr.org with any comments or suggestions.

Crime in Baltimore is up, but police presence is down, residents say.  Arrests have plummeted, open air drug markets operate freely and since May 1, six homicide victims were under 18.

With the possible exception of the moment when the people at Coke went back to the original formula, few things have been as universally celebrated in this country than American Pharoah’s win in the Belmont Saturday.

Abbott's Badge Collection via flickr

Baltimore’s police union announced Wednesday that it is launching a review of the police department’s actions in the days following Freddie Gray’s death from injuries sustained while in police custody.

Lt. Gene Ryan, president of the local Fraternal Order of Police, said more than 160 officers were injured during the riots after Gray’s funeral last month. He wants to clear up questions about what orders were given so that police officers will be safe should a similar situation arise in the future.  

Kathleen Cahill / wypr

For the first time since the city's unrest on April 27, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts talked openly yesterday about the situation his department faces as they try to re-build relationships with the community. He said it's a time of uncertainty for the city.

Mary Rose Madden

Local foundations and the federal government have promised to funnel money into Baltimore for job training programs to respond to some of the communities’ needs articulated during the weeks or protests after the death of Freddie Gray. But what happens when the jobs don’t materialize?

Take Janet Littlejohn, for example. She had a full basketball scholarship to Coppin State University right after high school.  She was working on her nursing degree until she broke her leg. She lost her scholarship and couldn’t afford tuition, so she had to drop out.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

  

Six police officers have been charged in the death of Freddie Gray with counts ranging from manslaughter and assault to false imprisonment.  One officer was charged with second degree murder.

Mary Rose Madden

Baltimore police wrapped up yesterday their investigation into the death of Freddie Gray - the 25 year old African American man who died from injuries sustained while in police custody. But the findings weren't released to the public. That disappointed many who have been searching for answers. 

Mary Rose Madden

After hundreds rioted in Baltimore, residents and business owners tried to pick themselves up – cleaning the streets, repairing their neighborhoods. McElderry Park is one neighborhood that needed repair the next day.  James Fletcher was checking in on folks when he stepped into a check cashing store in East Baltimore.  Rioters had broken windows, the door, stolen an atm machine, busted another one, and taken the cash.   Fletcher is the director of a mentoring program, MentorPlus COBC, in McElderry Park.  When the rioting broke out, he says he recognized some of the faces in the streets.

The intersection of North Ave. and Pennsylvania Ave. was a site of heartbreak on Monday night for many as the riot raged on.  On Tuesday, Baltimoreans were looking to help – and heal. Throughout the city, there were cleanups, prayer vigils, and meetups at community centers.  By the end of the day, you might have thought that Baltimoreans were exhausted. But that just wasn’t the case.

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