Fraser Smith

Senior News Analyst

Fraser Smith has been in the news business for over 30 years.  He began his reportorial career with the Jersey Journal, a daily New Jersey newspaper and then moved on to the Providence Journal in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1969 Fraser won a prestigious American Political Science Association Public Affairs Fellowship, which enabled him to devote a year to graduate study at Yale University.  In 1977, Fraser was hired away by The Baltimore Sun where in 1981, he moved to the newspaper's Washington bureau to focus on policy problems and their everyday effect on Marylanders.  In 1983, he became the Sun's chief political reporter.

During his career as a reporter, Fraser was the recipient of numerous journalism awards: from UPI New England in 1973, from AP New England in 1974 and 1975, from Roy W. Howard in 1975, from Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association in 1981, and from Sigma Delta Chi in 1986.  His Sun series on lead paint poisoning, which he wrote with his wife, Eileen Canzian, won first place and best of show honors in 1987 from the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association.  Between 1999 and 2003, he has served as an editorial writer and columnist for the Sun.

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Kyle Leslie, Matt Purdy / WYPR

Three years ago, Governor Martin O'Malley established a commission to study whether natural gas can be safely extracted from the Marcellus Shale, which runs under Garrett and Allegheny Counties. WYPR's Christopher Connelly talks with Fraser Smith about the study and the accompanying politics, as Maryland's next governor will decide whether to allow hydraulic fracturing in the state.

Kyle Leslie, Matt Purdy / WYPR

Republican gubernatorial hopeful Larry Hogan is at risk of being defined by his opponent, according to a recent editorial by the Baltimore Sun. Sun editorial page editor Andy Green joins WYPR's Fraser Smith to talk about the message war between Hogan and his rival, Democratic Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown.

Tom Chalkley

The thrill of victory, the agony of defeat.

Have ever had the two moments so jarringly juxtaposed? The fall of Ray Rice and the rise of the O’s? We are as distressed by the first as we are elated by the latter.

As the Rice matter continues to unfold, we are treated to the elation of seeing Orioles magic turn into something like routine. We know it all can turn to ashes. And that’s part of the thrill. You’re skating on the edge, finding a way to get the job done, as they say now.

Kyle Leslie, Matt Purdy / WYPR

Howard County will elect a new executive in November to replace Democrat Ken Ulman. WYPR's Fraser Smith and Amanda Yeager of the Howard County Times talk about the two well-known candidates running for the office and why the race has taken a strident tone.

Estelle Kline / WYPR

  The Baltimore Orioles clinched the American League Eastern Division title last night, giving the city a huge boost of good news after more than a week of decidedly unhappy happenings.

Kyle Leslie, Matt Purdy / WYPR

Due to State Sen. Brian Frosh's candidacy for Attorney General, Senate President Mike Miller must choose a new chair of the Judicial Proceedings Committee.

Kyle Leslie, Matt Purdy / WYPR

The Democratic Governors Association will buy $750,000 worth of television ads in Maryland's gubernatorial contest, despite what many assume will be an easy win for Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, the party's nominee.

Tom Chalkley

Are the Ravens and the NFL trapped in a bubble of their own devising?

Kyle Leslie, Matt Purdy / WYPR

The Supreme Court recently struck down a ban that limited the aggregate amount of money that one donor could give to all political candidates. WYPR's Fraser Smith and Bryan Sears of the Daily Record talk about how the change affects the state's system for tracking campaign contributions.

Kyle Leslie, Matt Purdy / WYPR

Governor Martin O'Malley's played a key role in bringing legalized slots and table games to Maryland. But he wasn't always so supportive. WYPR's Fraser Smith and John Wagner of the Washington Post talk about why O'Malley changed his mind.

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