Christopher Connelly

Reporter

Christopher Connelly is a political reporter for WYPR, covering the day-to-day movement and machinations in Annapolis. He comes to WYPR from NPR, where he was a Joan B. Kroc Fellow, produced for weekend All Things Considered and worked as a rundown editor for All Things Considered. Chris has a master’s degree in journalism from UC Berkeley. He’s reported for KALW (San Francisco), KUSP (Santa Cruz, Calif.) and KJZZ (Phoenix), and worked at StoryCorps in Brooklyn, N.Y. He’s filed stories on a range of topics, from a shortage of dog blood in canine blood banks to heroin addicts in Tanzania. He got his start in public radio at WYSO in Yellow Springs, Ohio, when he was a student at Antioch College.

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Christopher Connelly/WYPR

Gov. Larry Hogan signed 350 bills on Tuesday that were passed in the recent General Assembly session that ended last month. The list included some police accountability measures, bills aimed at improving the state's business climate and pieces of his own legislative agenda.

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan lifted the state of emergency on Wednesday that he initiated last Monday night after protests against the death of Freddie Gray turned into looting and rioting. The governor said there’s still a lot of work to be done to help the city recover and address the underlying cause of the rage that spilled out over the city’s streets.

A week after Baltimore’s mostly peaceful protests turned into riots, tensions flared again after a shot rang out at the intersection of Pennsylvania and North Avenues. Officers pursued a man carrying a handgun, which the police department says discharged when the revolver was dropped.

P. Kenneth Burns / WYPR

Six police officers have been charged in the death of Freddie Gray with counts ranging from manslaughter and assault to false imprisonment.  One officer was charged with second degree murder.

Staff Sgt. Ron Lee via flickr

The streets of Baltimore were relatively clear after 10 o’clock on Tuesday night, due to a curfew instituted by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Black after rioters destroyed buildings and set fires across the city.

In the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood, home to Freddie Gray, where demonstrations throughout the day took on a fairly festive tone, many people streamed away as night fell and the curfew loomed. But a handful of activists committed to stay out and test the police.

Gray sustained a fatal spine injury while in police custody, and died last Sunday.

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

Across Baltimore on Tuesday, volunteers and city workers fanned out to clean up damage caused by looters and riots last night after the funeral of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died from injuries suffered in police custody.

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

Governor Larry Hogan will sign legislation to make it legal for jurisdictions to put body cameras on police officers. The governor told reporters Thursday that it is a “small step” toward dealing with “a major problem” of people dying in police custody.

“Having the real evidence of exactly what happened, having everything videotaped is a step in the right direction, something we are going to support,” he said.

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

Despite the partisan budget stalemate that dominated headlines as the Maryland General Assembly session came to a close last week, lawmakers in Annapolis have been slowly moving in a new direction on drug policy and drawing support from both sides of the aisle.

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

Gov. Larry Hogan started signing some of the hundreds of bills passed by the General Assembly over the 90 day session on Tuesday, and it was a packed house where everyone was on their best behavior.


Christopher Connelly/WYPR

  Maryland’s General Assembly went out of business for another year on Monday, ending a session that many hoped would signal the dawn of a new bipartisan era in a party line budget settlement.  Gov. Larry Hogan praised the legislature for its bipartisan work, but said he probably wouldn’t spend money Democrats set aside for public education, state worker pay and Medicaid and other safety net programs.

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