Christopher Connelly

Reporter

Christopher Connelly is a political reporter for WYPR, covering the day-to-day movement and machinations in Annapolis. He comes to WYPR from NPR, where he was a Joan B. Kroc Fellow, produced for weekend All Things Considered and worked as a rundown editor for All Things Considered. Chris has a master’s degree in journalism from UC Berkeley. He’s reported for KALW (San Francisco), KUSP (Santa Cruz, Calif.) and KJZZ (Phoenix), and worked at StoryCorps in Brooklyn, N.Y. He’s filed stories on a range of topics, from a shortage of dog blood in canine blood banks to heroin addicts in Tanzania. He got his start in public radio at WYSO in Yellow Springs, Ohio, when he was a student at Antioch College.

Ways To Connect

When you apply for health insurance on the exchange, you’ve got to put in some basic information. Age, location, gender and income are some of the data points that the health exchange collects from applicants-- race and ethnicity are optional on the application. Taken together, these data points help paint a picture of who and where the exchange has successfully reached.

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

When Larry Hogan is sworn in next month, he’ll bring with him a whole new cabinet. The governor-elect started naming his cabinet picks Wednesday afternoon.

Hogan and his lieutenant governor – as well as his chief of staff, legislative director and his fiscal advisor – all served in former Republican Governor Bob Ehrlich’s administration. Another Ehrlich veteran, Jim Fielder, will join Hogan as appointments secretary. That’s the post that Hogan held a decade ago.

Christopher Connelly / WYPR

  Maryland should expect to have about $271 million dollars less than expected coming into its coffers over the next year and a half – that was the news out of the state’s Board of Revenue Estimates Monday. It follows already downgraded expectations for the state’s revenues.

Comptroller Peter Franchot, the state’s tax man, blamed cuts in federal spending for a state economy growing slower than expected. The state is home to about 300,000 federal workers, as well as numerous government contractors.

Gov.-elect Larry Hogan briefed reporters on the state’s fiscal situation yesterday afternoon and the picture he painted was dire. Maryland’s next governor says the state needs ‘strong medicine’ to fix its fiscal health after years of bad budgeting.

“Let me put it in everyday terms: They drained our checking, savings and retirement accounts. They maxed out every credit card. They tapped into Christmas funds, college tuition funds,  they even broke into every one of the kids piggy banks, and we still don’t have enough to pay the bills," Hogan said.

spike55151 via flickr

The State Center complex in Baltimore is one of the remaining items that Governor Martin O'Malley may push for in his last month in office. WYPR's Fraser Smith and Christopher Connelly talk about the origin of the project and why its future is in jeopardy.

Daniel Foster via flickr

    

  Gov. Martin O’Malley is ready to allow the controversial natural gas drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and he’s poised to propose the strictest standards in the country. But even after years of deliberation and contention, fracking in Maryland still holds more questions than answers.

Out in northern Garrett County, in far western Maryland, Frank Vitez has been waiting for years for hydraulic fracturing to come. When I visited him this fall, he took me up a hill on his property to show just how close he is to the Pennsylvania border. He knows that Pennsylvania landowners—people just like him—profit from the gas under their land. With the horizontal drilling techniques that have ushered in a new energy boom in the US, the well pads just beyond the border could be used to frack his gas.

Christopher Connelly / WYPR

Time is running out for Gov. Martin O'Malley to decide whether or not to commute Maryland's four remaining death sentences before he leaves office in January. WYPR's Fraser Smith and Christopher Connelly talk about why the state's repeal of the death penalty in 2013 created complicated legal questions for both O'Malley and the courts.

Christopher Connelly/WYPR

When the Maryland General Assembly starts its session in January, it will be dealing with a new governor from a different party and about a third of its members will be freshmen.  Between a Republican governor and a host of more left-leaning Democrats coming in, the next four years bear the signs of a more partisan landscape in Annapolis.

moneymatters-104 / Howard County Library System via flickr

Despite a strong Republican showing in last week's election, Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot easily won his bid to retain his seat. WYPR's Fraser Smith and Christopher Connelly talk about Franchot's unique place in the state Democratic party.

Maureen Harvie/WYPR

Baltimore is a good place for lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people, according to a new study from the Human Rights Campaign.

The nation's largest LGBT advocacy group’s Municipal Equality Index looked at more than 335 cities across the US. The cities were graded on 47 criteria including non-discrimination laws, recognition of same-sex relationships, law enforcement, and the inclusiveness of city hiring and services.

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