Carrie Johnson

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Attorney General William Barr released his now-famous four-page summary of the Mueller report on March 24. It appeared to draw conclusions about the nature of the investigation itself.

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Attorney General William Barr has been on the job for just 10 weeks, but in the short time he has led the Justice Department, he has already managed to put his stamp on the place.

In the long run, Barr's tenure may be judged by his handling of the special counsel report on Russian election interference — a performance that a book reviewer at The New York Times recently likened to a "velvet fog."

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Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET

Federal prosecutors are charging 60 doctors, pharmacists, medical professionals and others in connection with alleged opioid pushing and health care fraud, the Justice Department said Wednesday.

The charges came less than four months after the Justice Department dispatched experienced fraud prosecutors across hard-hit regions in Appalachia.

Updated at 3:03 p.m. ET

Former Obama White House counsel Greg Craig was charged with making false statements on Thursday in connection with what authorities called failures to report work for powerful clients in Ukraine.

A grand jury in Washington, D.C., returned an indictment on Thursday that included two charges, the Justice Department said.

In short, the indictment alleges that Craig withheld information he knew he should have given to the Justice Department and deliberately gave it other information he knew was false.

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This is Special Coverage of the Mueller report from NPR's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michel Martin. Special Counsel Robert Mueller delivered his report to the Justice Department on Friday. And after a day-and-a-half of review, the attorney general, William Barr, has drafted a four-page letter to Congress describing what he says are Mueller's conclusions. We are going to spend the next hour digging into that letter.

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We're going to turn back to Carrie Johnson, our national justice correspondent, for more on this whole question of whether or not President Trump obstructed justice in the investigation into his campaign. Carrie.

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We're going to turn now to our national justice correspondent, Carrie Johnson, who has been following this story from the beginning.

Hello, Carrie.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Hi there.

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